Transportation Master Plan

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The County of Brant has initiated an update to the County's Transportation Master Plan. The update is a comprehensive and multi-year planning exercise, in conjunction with the development of the new Official Plan. The new Official Plan was launched in November 2019 and is in process of being finalized.

The Transportation Master Plan will:

  • Include an inclusive multi-modal transportation system that safely and reliably connects the places where we live, work and play.
  • Set the strategic direction for developing the County’s transportation system and providing the infrastructure to support growth;
  • Identify the transportation facilities and services that the County of

The County of Brant has initiated an update to the County's Transportation Master Plan. The update is a comprehensive and multi-year planning exercise, in conjunction with the development of the new Official Plan. The new Official Plan was launched in November 2019 and is in process of being finalized.

The Transportation Master Plan will:

  • Include an inclusive multi-modal transportation system that safely and reliably connects the places where we live, work and play.
  • Set the strategic direction for developing the County’s transportation system and providing the infrastructure to support growth;
  • Identify the transportation facilities and services that the County of Brant requires to serve the projected future population;
  • Support the growth management strategies of the Official Plan, give policy direction and inform development patterns and long-range financial planning; and
  • Develop policies and guidelines for all modes of transportation in the County, including walking, cycling, goods movement and auto travel, and support rail, public transportation and aviation services.

What We Heard from Public Meeting #1

A virtual public meeting was held on Thursday March 31, 2022 from 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm. Presentation slides are available on the right hand side (titled March 2022 - Presentation slides).

Results from the feedback received to the interactive map and online survey conducted as part of
Public Meeting #1 can generally be grouped into the following themes:

• Congestion in Downtown Paris, especially along Grand River Street and William Street;
• Support to build a bypass around Paris as a response to growth, congestion and truck movements;
• Concerns about trucks traveling through Paris, as well as other safety concerns regarding
trucks on specific road segments;
• Walking and cycling are important modes—supporting related infrastructure in both urban
and rural settings is an important action that can promote healthy and connected communities and
enhance safety;
• General interest among respondents to implement transit service throughout the County,
connecting major communities and the City of Brantford; and
• General interest among respondents to expand regional transit connections to the City of
Brantford, the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, the Region of Waterloo and Niagara Falls.

Update - October 2022

The County of Brant has completed its Transportation Master Plan update.

The Plan recommends solutions that respond to the following needs and opportunities:

  • Rapid growth: Meet the needs of existing and future travel demand
  • Localized issues: Improve road network safety and operations
  • Goods movement: Ensure efficient goods movement
  • Active transportation: Make active transportation more attractive
  • Public transit: Grow transit connections and coverage within, to and from the County of Brant

What we learned

Two rounds of consultation were held throughout the study, including a public survey, live public meeting and two stakeholder meetings. Feedback received shaped the Plan and ensures solutions meaningfully respond to local desires, which highlighted an interest in:

  • Improved safety and road operations
  • Support for cycling connections
  • Improved transit
  • The need to respond to congestion in and around Paris

The draft Transportation Master Plan Summary Report was presented to Council on September 27, 2022. The County of Brant hosted a public review period from November 1, 2022 to December 9, 2022.

Engage With Us!

Please subscribe to this page for future updates.

This study is being conducted in accordance with the requirements of Phases 1 and 2 of the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment manual, (October 2000, as amended 2007, 2011 and 2015), which is an approved process under the Environmental Assessment Act.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Your questions, comments, concerns and ideas are welcome.

  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    The traffic in Paris has outpaced the capacity of The main road through Paris, i.e. highway 24 or pinehurst road. With further development planned in Paris, it’s going to get worse. Roundabouts are need on Cockshutt road south of Phelps to enable traffic from Burtch to gain access to Cockshutt.

    Secookee asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    A Paris West Bypass will present an alternative routing for trucks and other vehicles around Paris or to access the north end of Paris from the 403. Newly constructed roundabouts at Puttown Road and Highway #2, and Highway #2 and Bishopsgate Road in Falkland will provide improved traffic movement along the Paris West Bypass. In the longer term, it is recommended that the County undertake a Grand River Crossing Environmental Assessment by 2041, Bishopsgate Rd /Highway 403 interchange would serve a local purpose providing an additional access to the Highway for south Paris but also a key function would be an egress from this west bypass route to the Highway without using Rest Acres Road, and potentially improving the route to general traffic vs traveling through downtown Paris.  With respect to Cockshutt Road, turning lanes were included at two locations in the 2022 asphalt resurfacing project.  These intersections may warrant additional improvements (roundabouts or traffic signals) in the future.  The County will continue to monitor the traffic flows and safety on Cockshutt Road.

    C. Brown,

    Public Works Technologist

    M. Eby,

    Director of Infrastructure Services

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    What are we doing to have better transit services from Paris On at odd hours like early morning or late night. So there are many factories in Brantford and we work in different shifts like afternoon, night or early morning. It is important for us to have transit services at odd hours to be able to reach out at work.

    anjemanu asked 2 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    The following directions will support residents and visitors over the forthcoming decades as public transit continues to grow in importance both within the County and to the greater region and beyond.

    Brant Transit - As communities grow, continue to expand Brant Transit to better serve ridership needs throughout the County of Brant (e.g., fleet expansion and improved service hours). Continue to assess the need for fixed-route transit services within Paris and/or connecting communities within the County of Brant and pilot the services where viable.

    Brantford Transit - Continue to seek partnerships with adjacent municipalities to provide or improve transit connections (e.g., the County of Brant is currently partnering with Brantford Transit to pilot a service for employment areas near Paris). Assess the viability of providing access to the Brantford train station for connections between Paris and VIA Rail.

    Ontario - Continue to participate with the Province in developing an inter-regional bus terminal (e.g., GO Transit) with park-and-ride facility at Highway 403 and Rest Acres Road in Paris. Advocate for the inclusion of Paris in the Province’s planned Brantford-Cambridge-Kitchener/Waterloo regional bus connection (e.g., bus stop or terminal on the east side of Paris).

    C. Brown,

    Public Works Technologist

    M. Eby,

    Director of Infrastructure Services

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    If you're considering hardtop conversion of existing gravel roads that contain a plan for pedestrian/cycling paths crossing them, then such roads should not be a candidate for conversion. Hardtop roads make for increased vehicular speeds which would jeopardize pedestrian/cycling traffic safety! Why would you needlessly spend our money?

    B & C Kelley asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    The active transportation routes proposed in the TMP will be reviewed when the County updates the trail master plan.  Safety of all road users is considered as a part of all County projects.

    C. Brown,

    Public Works Technologist

    M. Eby,

    Director of Infrastructure Services

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    what improvements are being made to grand river street north? Also what is the time frame for all this to happen ?

    Dianne Peirce asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    The County of Brant have completed a Class Environmental Assessment for Grand River Street North, the recommendation brought forward from the study is to widen Grand River Street North to four lanes from Hartley Avenue to St. Patrick Street, and from St. Patrick Street to William Street. This work will include intersection improvements (roundabouts at Hartley, Scott, Trillium and Silver in the future). Design for this project began in 2021, with construction starting in 2023 to be phased over multiple years to complete.

    C. Brown,

    Public Works Technologist

    M. Eby,

    Director of Infrastructure Services

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    What is planned for the intersection of Cockshutt Road and Oakland road? Cockshutt is currently being used as a drag strip for drivers from outside of Brant to access other Counties. It is used as a short cut between Highway 403 in Cainsville to Simcoe and Port Dover, rather than travelling on the 403 or Highway 24. We should not be facilitating it for this use by widening or adding turn lanes which will only encourage more large truck use. We should be trying to discourage out of county traffic using this as a short cut by reducing speed limits and adding "calming" measures as most larger cities are now doing as well as increased police enforcement.

    Ken Spong asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for your question.  It has recently come to our attention that we did not respond in a timely manner to your comments, and we apologize for that. The EngageBrant software (Bang the Table) is new to the County over the last year, and we are striving to make better and more efficient use of it.

    Cockshutt Road is currently classified as a Rural Arterial Road.  Rural Arterial roads serve as the primary connections in rural areas between activity centres. They connect directly with provincial highways, as well as to other arterials and collector roads. They are designed to carry high volumes of traffic.  The recent work on Cockshutt Road to partially pave the shoulder and provide turn lanes is in part to provide a safer road facility for all users and reduce gravel shoulder maintenance.

    C. Brown,

    Public Works Technologist

    M. Eby,

    Director of Infrastructure Services

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    Comments for your consideration: I am concerned that Consolidated Drive will become a County Road and that there will be industrial traffic traversing down Consolidated Drive to Willow Street. The rail trail crosses Consolidated Drive (close to Willow) and there are many family residences walking/riding bicycles both on the trail and on Willow Street. Although industrial traffic (trucks, waste/by-products) would not be permitted to drive down to Willow, I would want a physical barrier preventing such traffic because it is human nature to take the shortest path from point A to point B whether or not allowed. For purpose of commuting to Brantford for work, it would be fantastic to have bicycle lanes on Paris Road. The rail trail is enjoyable however, it takes longer than Paris Road and there is no winter maintenance. Not sure whether the County has jurisdiction over the railway crossing on Oak Park Road but, holy guacamole that is some bumping crossing. The ruts really need to be filled. And, finally, downtown Paris sidewalks and stores are not wheelchair friendly. It's not just access into shops but the slope of the sidewalk. As one crosses the Ninth River bridge, rounding the corner into the downtown the slope is ridiculously steep toward the road + centrifugal force of the corner... I had a difficult time keeping my friend's wheel chair upright. Quite scary actually. Thank you for soliciting resident input into our awesome Brant County and town of Paris.

    Anne Williamson-Hyett asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for your comment/question.  It has recently come to our attention that we did not respond in a timely manner to your comments, and we apologize for that. The EngageBrant software (Bang the Table) is new to the County over the last year, and we are striving to make better and more efficient use of it.

    Consolidated Drive is not proposed be extended to connect to Willow and on the proposed site plan for Tigercat, this lane will be posted and signed no trucks.  Design of the lane/trail crossing includes traffic calming measures to limit speed and prioritize safety.  Over time, Paris Road will be widened to include a partially paved shoulder to reduce gravel shoulder maintenance and allow for improved active transportation.  Timing for this would be as the existing asphalt needs replacement.  The County of Brant do not have jurisdiction over CN railway crossings, but the Oak Park Road crossing as just been resurfaced to address the roughness.  The downtown core of Paris (between William and Mechanic) will be reconstructed in the coming years.  At that time the sidewalk width, slope and access to businesses will be addressed as much as possible.  The Nith River Bridge crossing is not in the 10 year plan for any major improvements, but Grand River South is in the 10 year plan for improvements and sidewalk will be addressed at that time.

    The Transportation Master Plan Update recommends the following for walking and wheeling:

    • Update road design standards to require sidewalks be provided on a minimum of one side of new urban roads, and on both sides where appropriate in accordance with functional road classification characteristics and Complete Streets strategies.
    • Continue to infill where need is highest, ensuring AODA accessibility standards are followed.
    • Add sidewalks, where missing, as part of all road reconstruction projects in accordance with Official Plan policies.
    • Undertake a pedestrian needs study to conduct a gap analysis of the existing sidewalk and trail network and prioritize the construction of the highest need sidewalk gaps.


    C. Brown,

    Public Works Technologist

    M. Eby,

    Director of Infrastructure Services

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    I have quickly reviewed TMP. I see no reference to a new HWY#424. How does the County anticipate handling the additional traffic - minimum 600 transport trucks per day plus an untold number of vans - resulting from a proposed 1.3 million square foot warehouse proposed for St. George.. How would the traffic get to HWY 403 and HWY 401 - otherwise. This surge in traffic would be in addition to the significant increases in transportation already underway due to unprecedented growth in Paris and Brantford. Thanks for your consideration and comments.

    Guod asked 9 months ago

    Thank you for your question.  It has recently come to our attention that we did not respond in a timely manner to your comments, and we apologize for that. The EngageBrant software (Bang the Table) is new to the County over the last year, and we are striving to make better and more efficient use of it.

    Highway 424 would be a Provincial facility and initiative of the MTO to complete but there currently is no proposed plan to move forward with it in the foreseeable future.  The County will continue to monitor Provincial/MTO initiatives and participate in stakeholder groups when requested.  With respect to growth in St. George, proponents are required to complete a Traffic Impact Study (TIS) for review and approval by the County for their developments.  Traffic growth is covered through these required TISs.

    C. Brown,

    Public Works Technologist

    M. Eby,

    Director of Infrastructure Services

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    Why are we concerned over all these proposals of bike lanes, when there should be some consideration of County Residents as I mean farmer’s with land base spread out through the municipality trying to get machinery from farm to another!! Safety, Safety,Safety , has to be considered!! Keep these bike riders on Trail’s!! Farmers are residents, bikers are just visiting!!

    Brian Coleman asked 10 months ago

    Thank you for your comment/question.  It has recently come to our attention that we did not respond in a timely manner to your comments, and we apologize for that. The EngageBrant software (Bang the Table) is new to the County over the last year, and we are striving to make better and more efficient use of it.

    Bicycles are a legal vehicle under the Highway Traffic Act, just like Farm Machinery and we need to accommodate all road users. You are correct that in Brant we have many needs to address and in the rural areas the cycling components are not a large cost item, but we do need to look at cost efficient measures. The County of Brant has received a growing interest among the public and stakeholders in promoting and incentivizing cycling as an alternative to driving throughout the County. The need was identified in Phase I of the TMP to make active transportation more attractive; this helps build healthier, complete communities, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.  Improved active transportation across the entire municipality is a vision of County Council and was reflected in the TMP.  Brant roads need to be a safe place for all users.

    C. Brown,

    Public Works Technologis

    M. Eby,

    Director of Infrastructure Services

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    Where do I access the supporting traffic studies that have been used to come up with the recommendations? The recommendations say short term improvements to Keg Lane and Ayr Road together with the long term Bishopsgate 403 interchange will complete the "Paris West Bypass" What is the estimated timeline for the completion of the " Paris West Bypass" ? What does long term mean? What is the basis for the belief that any significant amount of traffic will be diverted from Downtown Paris through this bypass? Given that the operation of the Grand River Street North and William Street intersection has already been found in previous traffic studies to be functioning at unacceptable levels how is it justified to potentially wait until 2041 to address. On Sunday at noon ( hardly a peak traffic time)I timed my wait to turn left off of William Street at Grand River Street North and it was 5 minutes. I don't see the realignment of Paris Links Road to meet with Silver Street anywhere in the recommended road projects???

    David Clement asked 10 months ago

    Thank you for your question.  It has recently come to our attention that we did not respond in a timely manner to your comments, and we apologize for that. The EngageBrant software (Bang the Table) is new to the County over the last year, and we are striving to make better and more efficient use of it.

    The Phase I through III reports are available on the engagebrant.ca website, https://engagebrant.ca/transportationmasterplan under the “Documents” tab. These reports provide more detail and were the basis for the TMP recommendations. The Bishopsgate 403 interchange construction (with cost-sharing support from the Province) will complete the Paris West Bypass (2030 to 2035 approx.). The realignment of Paris Links Road to meet with Silver Street (will be called West River Road) was a requirement of the subdivision approval and plans to complete the design and construction are in the works. This project was approved as part of the Grand River St N Class EA and is planned for 2024.

    C. Brown,

    Public Works Technologist

    M. Eby,

    Director of Infrastructure Services

Page last updated: 12 Dec 2022, 08:51 AM